Top 10 Worst Things About Being Gluten Free

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This was probably the easiest post to write and the hardest post to publish. I’m a positive person and I hate to complain, especially about being gluten free. In fact, you’ll find that the Gluten Free blogging community is over-run with very positive people. It could be because we all feel so much better now. It could be because we don’t want to discourage our readers. We all really want people to be successful at being gluten free,  it’s possible and can even be easy. But a week ago I joined Reddit. People on Reddit are remarkably honest about their gluten free experience. And some, even though they feel better, are very unhappy about being gluten free.


As I was reading through a few of these unhappy posts, I realized, they really do speak for everyone. Being gluten free, (or dairy free, or peanut allergic, or any special dietary need) can be a pain. Dinner at a friend’s house is difficult, vacations involve stressful internet searches for gluten free menus. Lets be honest. Your health is way better, and you’ll never go back to that sick, pain-filled reality, but life has certainly changed and sometimes you just need to know that someone else is going through this too.


So I thought I’d share my own top ten worst things about being gluten free.  I’ve combined some and left out some (top 13 posts are just messy, right?) and they’re all in sort of a random order, until you get to number one. Number one is my top worst thing about being gluten free. No doubt.


If you’re interested, here’s a link to Reddit’s gluten free subreddit. Lots of stuff on there from people who are gluten free and people who have to deal with gluten free customers and family members. (There’s some pretty frank language, so if you have young kids who are able to read you might want to wait until they’re out of the room before you click over. If you’re easily angered or offended or already having a bad day, just stay here.)

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Goodbye dear HOT NOW sign and all you represent.
photo from Krispykreme.com




Top 10 Worst Things About Being Gluten Free

10- not being able to grab a quick snack when you’re out

9- mandatory (family/work) dinners at non-gluten friendly restaurants

8- having to read every label in the grocery store and then having to throw out something because you didn’t read the label carefully enough

7- making everything from scratch

6- driving past the Hot Now sign at Krispy Kreme

5- getting accidentally glutened

4- people being surprised at how sick you are when you get accidentally glutened

3- having to do hours of research every time you want to eat at a new restaurant

2- pretending you’re not really hungry anyway

1- being “that girl” (that whiny, fussy, absurdly needy girl) at the dinner party

 

Please feel free to share your own challenges in the comments. We’re all in this together! Is your number one the same as mine? Did I miss one? Any tips for others struggling?

I’m linking up with Vegetarian Mamma’s Gluten Free Fridays, an awesome gluten free resource, lots of other gluten free recipes and tips so make sure you check it out. If you’re another blogger visiting from Gluten Free Fridays, let me know so I don’t miss your post! :)



Thanks for visiting! I’d love to connect!

11 thoughts on “Top 10 Worst Things About Being Gluten Free

    • Hey Kellie, for sure! I think only people who have food issues can really understand this post. (but I have heard a few people say that they feel so great they don’t miss anything about eating gluten, and I’m like, really? You don’t miss just being able to go and eat a hamburger? )

      • I am so happy I went gluten-free, and if it was just about giving up bread, I could handle it–but it’s not. I am still surprised at how depressed I can get about food, standing up for myself, or explaining to someone that, although they tried really hard to make it “safe,” I still can’t eat the food they prepared.

        A well-composed list, Jodi. I love it. Honestly, the emotional side of it is so much harder than the food side. ; )

        • For sure Lisa! Explaining can be so difficult. And I hate it when I have to turn down specially made food. Once a friend completely ruined dinner for me, and she used another wheat based product to do it. I felt so terrible (and guilty) that I wasn’t eating it. Glad you can relate! (and I really do feel so much better being gluten free that there’s absolutely no way I’d even cheat, but man, it can be inconvenient!)

  1. Amazing and true post, Jodi! :)

    Although if I could add a #11, I would have to add “Dating with Celiac”…because it sucks royally! Panic-stricken about getting glutened on a date (THAT paints a pretty picture, doesn’t it?!) then “goodbye spontaneity!” with a first-date-kiss, because let’s face it – if that guy has eaten gluten in the last 6 hours, then I’m screwed. :/

    I know I’m doing what I need to do for my body, but I do get so tired of being AFRAID of eating outside my home! I love this website though…I’ve been stricly GF (Celiac) for over 2 years and I still need support, haha! And I agree with Lisa – the emotional side is MUCH harder than the food side!

    • I can’t imagine dating with celiac and honestly I’ve been married so long, I can’t even begin to offer advice on it. Anyone have any tips for Erica?

      I do understand the constant fear of cross-contamination though. I try to stick to restaurants with a great gluten-free track record (like Texas de Brazil) or a totally gluten free restaurant.

      Glad you’re here Erica, and if you get a chance, stop by Freedible.com, it’s awesome for support. I’m Jodi @ Knowgluten there and I moderate the gluten free group.

  2. I was glutened this weekend – I’m mostly angry that it wasn’t even delicious! My pal gave me a margarita but failed to tell me that her mom made them with beer! Bud light at that! For 3 small drinks, I’m now in pain, bloated, nauseated, foggy-brained, cranky, and tired. I miss being able to eat what I wanted w/o worry or w/o people acting like I’m making it all up. Celiacs know this isn’t something we want attention for – it’s not like we choose to get sick or have reactions to food we used to love. The hardest transition for me was not being able to quickly grab something to eat as I ran out the door for grad school or work. I am in a very tiny apartment and cooking/baking enough “safe” food for the week is next to impossible. I’m so grateful for your quick and easy recipe section – and for companies that make it easy for us to know their food is actually celiac safe. I just wish it were less expensive 😉

    Thanks for the blog – I am so grateful to be able to post with like minds who would happily tuck into a maple bar with me should it be a painless experience :)

    • Seriously? Who makes margaritas with beer? So sorry Mary.
      You’re right, gluten free treats can be expensive. I try to keep my costs down by eating naturally gluten free food and by getting my flours at an Asian grocery. I find I can get tapioca and rice flour for much less.
      If you live in a tiny apartment, you’ll really like a site called My Gluten Free Girlfriend. Laurie, who runs the site, has alot of smaller sized recipes. And in a couple of weeks she’ll be moving into an RV so she’ll have lots more small space ideas.

  3. The thing I miss the most is Panera’s Mac and Cheese! I loved it even though it kept making me sick.

    • I feel you on that one! I’m Dairy and Nut Free and would kill for some Mac and Cheese that doesn’t taste like cardboard.

      • I totally get ya. Dairy free mac and cheese tastes a little like someone heated up a bottle of glue and poured it over noodles. I’ll ask around and see if I can find a better alternative.

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